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The Perfect Refined-Sugar Free Southern Cornbread Recipe

Homemade southern cornbread was a staple in my grandma’s Arkansas kitchen and we ate it all the time. If you’re looking for delicious and refined-sugar-free healthy cornbread, you’ll love this easy recipe!

The Perfect Refined-Sugar Free Southern Cornbread Recipe

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Refined Sugar Free Southern Cornbread Recipe

When I was young, I didn’t appreciate the bean soup my grandma served us, but I always enjoyed her cornbread. A homemade cornbread is a real treat, especially when you use an easy southern cornbread recipe, like I’m sharing today!

Now I know that the perfect cornbread recipe can be a hot topic. Should it be sweet or not? Crumbly or not? I guess it all boils down to personal preference, but this recipe more closely resembles how I’ve seen cornbread prepared in the south. I’ve had “cornbread” here in Iowa and I do not consider it true cornbread. They best way to describe it is moist and cakey. Ick!

refined sugar free cornbread

This cornbread is flavorful, yet crumbly. I do add a few tablespoons of honey to give it a slight hint of sweet, but it could not be described as cake-sweet. It’s a family favorite recipe and I hope you like it!

Ingredients for this healthy cornbread recipe

You’ll get a better result if you use better ingredients. I grind my own corn meal and flour in my Nutrimill grain mill. While I think there are a lot of benefits to grinding your own flours, you certainly don’t have to. I would recommend that you buy a high quality corn meal flour though – Bob’s Red Mill makes a nice medium ground cornmeal that I like. I also recommend using aluminum-free baking powder (Rumford is my preferred brand) and buttermilk as well. If you don’t have buttermilk, easily make your own by combining 1 TBS with enough milk to make a cup! Super easy.

the perfect southern cornbread recipe, refined sugar free

Overall, this recipe is really easy. Mix the dry ingredients, fold in wet ingredients, bake in a cast iron skillet in a hot oven. Using bacon grease to oil the skillet gives the cornbread a little bit of bacon flavor – highly recommend! By the way, here’s the super easy way I save bacon grease and a ton of uses for it!

Here’s the easy peasy recipe! Try it and I bet you’ll never go back to a pre-bought mix!

Easy Cornbread Recipe

Yield: 8 servings

Refined Sugar Free Southern Cornbread

Refined Sugar Free Southern Cornbread

If you're looking for delicious and refined-sugar-free healthy cornbread, you'll love this easy recipe!

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour {I use freshly ground hard white wheat}
  • 1 cup cornmeal {I use freshly ground blue cornmeal}
  • 3 TBS raw honey
  • 1 TBS baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 TBS bacon grease
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • ¼ cup melted butter

Instructions

  1. Preheat over to 450F. In a medium bowl, stir together flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.
  2. Melt 1 TBS bacon grease in a round cast iron skillet. If you don't want to use bacon grease, you can also use butter.
  3. In a small bowl, combine eggs, milk, and butter. Add to the flour mixture and stir until just mixed.
  4. Pour into the hot skillet and bake for 15-20 minutes.
  5. Serve with honey and or butter. Enjoy!

Notes

If you don't have buttermilk, make it quickly by putting one TBS vinegar in your one cup measuring cup. Then fill with milk. Let it sit for 5 minutes, and you have homemade buttermilk.

So now the biggest question is – what’s the perfect topping for cornbread? Butter? Honey? Or, something else??

cast iron southern cornbread from scratch

If you liked this easy cornbread recipe, you might like these recipes too:

Wilted Lettuce Salad with Hot Bacon Dressing

How to Store Bacon Grease & 12 Ways to Use It

How to Make Whole Wheat Bread with a KitchenAid

Great Grandma Shafer’s Amazing Strawberry Shortcake

How to Store Seeds – My Favorite Garden Seed Organizer

Are you wondering how to store seeds? I’ve been using a photo box for several years now and think it makes the best garden seed organizer ever! Take control of your seeds using this cool box! The Best Garden Seed Organizer Ever!

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How to Store Seeds – My Favorite Garden Seed Organizer

For years I had a haphazard garden seed organizing system which amounted to shoving seed packets in a shoebox or a ziplock baggie (or both) and putting them in a “safe spot” I was sure to forget about. Sound familiar at all? If you’re like I was, I highly recommend upgrading to this awesome photo box I got on Amazon. I think it’s a real bargain at under $20.

4 x 6 boxes for saving seeds in my favorite box

Photo keeper boxes come in many different sizes, but the one I like best is this one. It’s one big box with 16 – 4×6 little boxes inside. The little boxes are exactly the right size for my beloved Baker Creek seed packets. One of these days, I will even label the outside of the 16 little boxes so I have a better idea of what’s inside each one. For now, it’s pretty easy to see what’s inside because the boxes are see-through. The only time suck is I have to physically lift each one to see the front. 😀

tomatoes in my favorite seed saving box

I try to keep like seeds in one box. For instance, tomato seeds are in one box. Pepper seeds in another, flowers, herbs, zucchini, corn, etc. Believe it or not, all 16 of my boxes are full. Sometimes I even keep empty packets in the boxes so I can go through them in the winter and decide what to order again.

Close the seed packets tightly

My only caveat is that you have to close each envelope tightly or the seeds will fall out. That’s not necessarily a huge problem unless you have a lot of different types of seed packets open in each box. It’s pretty hard to tell one broccoli seed from a kale or cabbage seed!

Garden Seed Storage Made Easy!

All in all, I love this seed saving box. It’s easy to use, handy to store, and quick to find. It makes ordering new seeds a snap and keeps all my pretty little lovelies safe and sound. If you’d like to order one too, head on over to Amazon. You can order a box with a purple handle for under $20, or get the white handled box for $30. I’d personally save $10 and order more seeds. 🙂 If you have an absolute ton of seeds, you can also get two large white boxes for $35.

Make sure to keep the box in a cool, dark place to give your seeds the longest life. Happy Organizing!

seed-saving-box

Need more garden awesomeness? Try these posts:

Tips for Ordering Garden Seeds

Helpful Supplies for Starting Seeds Indoors

Tips for Starting Broccoli & Other Brassicas

Free Containers to Start Garden Seeds

Free Catalogs for the Organic Gardener / Homesteader

My favorite way to store garden seeds is in this garden seed organizer.

What’s your favorite way to store garden seeds? I’d love to know! 

Top 10 Plants for Early Spring Harvest

If you’re trying to eat local, in-season food, make sure to include these top ten plants for early spring harvest. They will yield the first food in the spring so you can have farm fresh produce as soon as possible.

top 10 plants for early spring harvest

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One of my long term life dreams is to eat only locally grown and produced food, like Barbara Kingsolver did in her book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle {one of my most favorite books of all times}. At first thought, it sounds kind of doable, right? I mean, I have a big garden, and I have egg and meat chickens. I’ve also found a source for local pastured pork and organic, local, grassfed beef. But the logistics are really a lot more complicated than my pea-brain can handle. And it would take a REALLY REALLY REALLY big garden to produce enough food to feed my family of six. Maybe some day.

For now, I will be content to do what I can, and that means maximizing every growing season, and this post starts with spring! Enjoy my list of the top 10 plants to consider if you want to get the earliest possible harvest out of your garden.

Top 10 Plants for Early Spring Harvest

bowl of strawberries and asparagus in the grass

Early Spring Perennials

I love perennials because I can plant them once, and reap the rewards for years! It’s also a bonus that a few garden perennials produce some of the earliest food in the spring, so make sure to include them in your garden.

Rhubarb – it seems a lot of people have a love/hate relationship with rhubarb, but I love it. It’s also ready for picking sooner than most other fruits and is delicious in crisps, scones, and made into syrup too!

Strawberries – strawberries are the first berries to ripen, usually late May or early June in my area. Nothing beats a fresh strawberry right out of the garden! And since conventionally grown strawberries are some of the most pesticide laden fruits grown, we prefer to grow our own.

asparagus on a sheet pan for roasting

Asparagus – asparagus is ready for a full harvest the third year after it’s planted. It’s one of the earliest crops of spring – so delicious!! We look forward to fresh asparagus every year.

Spring Veggies to Plant before the Last Frost

Spring Onions / Potatoes – can be directly sown from seed six weeks before the last frost if the ground is workable. Onions grow quickly and the greens can be cut pretty soon after they start growing. If you leave the bulb in the ground and just cut the greens, they will even grow new greens for you!

Potatoes are generally ready for harvest a little later, but you can carefully collect new potatoes without disturbing the plant ten weeks after the potatoes were planted. We use the no-dig planting method to grow potatoes. Learn more here.

Spinach / Kohlrabi / Kale – can be directly sown from seed five weeks before the last frost date. It’s especially important to plant spinach early as it needs six cool weeks to reach maturity and bolts quickly in hot weather.

Peas / Radish / Carrots – can be directly sown from seed four weeks before last frost date. Peas also don’t do well in hot weather, so make sure to plant them as quickly as possible. Every year I have volunteer radish crops in my garden because I let some go to seed in the summer. They are some of the first fresh veggies we eat!

Forellensuss Lettuce

Lettuce / Swiss Chard – can be directly sown from seed two weeks before last frost date. I also have volunteer lettuce in my garden from time to time and love it! Fresh lettuce is just delicious.

Check your seed packets to see which varieties mature the quickest. Some radishes are ready within 25 days! And lettuce is very quick growing too.

A collage of  pictures including strawberries in a bowl, forelenschuss lettuce, and a basket of eggs and lettuce harvest.

What plants do you look forward to most in spring?

These 5 Easy Tips will Help You Keep Fall Mums Alive All Season

Fall mums are an awesome addition to your fall decor! If you’d like to keep your mums alive and beautiful all season, you need to know how to care for mums in the fall. These five tips are all you need to know for beautiful, long lasting mums this fall.
fall mums and pumpkins

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I love decorating with fall mums – available in many colors and varieties, mums are a great addition to your outdoor fall decorating scheme. The have long lasting blooms and look great in pots and landscape as well! Check out all of these pretty ways to decorate with mums from Midwest Family Living! Like most things in life, a little effort will keep your mums looking their best all season long!

How to Care for Mums in the Fall

Re-pot fall mums after you get home

repot fall mums after buying if they are root bound in the pot

It’s important to give your mums room to grow.  Most mums you buy at the store are totally root-bound so make sure to check your mums and put them in a pot at least twice their current size if you want them to keep growing all season.

Place your fall mums in an good location

how to keep your fall mums alive

Mums need at least six hours of sunlight a day, so skip shady locations and make sure to place mums in spots that get plenty of sun! Remember that as the days become shorter the position of the sun changes. A spot that was sunny in the summer may no longer be sunny. Just be mindful of the changing sun position during the fall. If you get your fall mums early in the season, you may need to move them to a new location as fall progresses.

Make sure your fall mums get enough water

make sure to water your fall mums enough to keep them alive all season - Copy

It’s very important not to let your mums dry out or they might just die on you like the one above. Then again, it’s also important not to over water them either. How much water is enough but not too much? That’s the million dollar question. Just make sure the dirt stays moist, but not drenched. 😉

Don’t forget to deadhead to keep fall mums alive

deadhead mums to keep them alive longer - Copy

I know deadheading is no fun, but if you want your mum to re-flower – you have to get rid of the dead ones first. Grab a trusty pair of snips and cut away while listening to your favorite music or chatting with a dear friend. Or just use your fingers. Honestly, I think the easiest way to deahead mums is just to pinch off the dead flowers with my fingers. You have to be careful or you will kill the baby buds that might be lurking under the dead flowers, waiting for their chance to shine!

Cover or bring them inside if it’s going to freeze overnight.

Continued cold weather will kill your mums so watch the forecast. If a freak frost is in the forecast, either cover your mums or bring them inside over night. This practice doesn’t work long term, but it can help your mums last a few more weeks if you want to prolong their lives!

tips for keeping your fall mums beautiful


More posts on fall gardening & plant care you may like:

Tips for decorating for fall

How to start a fall vegetable garden now

How to cover a raised garden bed to extend your growing season

15 Fall gardening tasks 

Types of heirloom garlic to plant this fall

Fun ways to decorate pumpkins without carving

Want to know how to keep fall mums alive all season long? These five easy tips will help you keep your lovely fall mums beautiful for as long as possible!