facebook pinterest twitter google instagram rss

Acrossed?

Here’s another 5 Minute Grammar Lesson. 🙂

A Grammer Lesson on the workd Acrossed ??

When we moved to Iowa 5 years ago, I started saying “Acrossed,” as in “I went acrossed town yesterday.” It’s something a LOT of people say in these here parts 🙂 and I picked it up without realizing it. I was talking to my sister one day on the phone and said something with “acrossed” in it. She started laughing and had me repeat it. Once I repeated it, I was horrified! How could I, an English teacher of all things, say “acrossed?” Needless to say, that day was the last day I uttered that terrible word.

Since then, I hear it everywhere! My hubby, bless his heart, my father in law, friends…it’s rampant in Iowa. Thankfully, my husband quit using it very soon after I pointed it out…

Anyhow, ACROSS is a preposition (He went across the street.) and sometimes an adverb (She ran across to say hello.) It it never used (correctly) in the past tense.

CROSS is the verb that can be used correctly in the past tense: “He crossed the street.”

And there’s your 5 Minute Grammar Lesson. Do you hear “acrossed” where you live?

5 Minute Grammar Lesson – Everyday or Every Day?

Here’s another 5 Minute Grammar Lesson!

5 minutes grammar lesson - Everyday or Every Day

I see mistakes with every and day almost Every Day! 😉 When should they be combined as one word and when should the be separated into two words?

Everyday means ordinary, normal, commonplace. It’s an adjective that modifies a noun: His everyday coat is dirty.

Every day means “each day.” “Every” is an adjective that modifies the noun “day:” I have to eat chocolate and drink wine every day or I will go nuts.

I am continually surprised by how many, many places mistake the two usages. Have you seen them used incorrectly? 🙂