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5 Minute Grammar Lesson – Who’s or Whose?

Curious about the right time to use WHO’s or WHOSE? These two commonly mistaken words mix up a lot of really smart people, but the concept is pretty easy to learn. Keep reading for the simple explanation.Who's or Whose 5 Minute Grammar Lesson on SimplifyLiveLove

*This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting my site.*

Who’s or Whose?

WHO’S is always a contraction for WHO IS. It never notates possession. Ever. Just make that quick switch right now and commit to memory and you will be fine for ever more.

WHOSE is always a possessive adjective. I know there is no apostrophe. But it’s still possessive. Just because English is a really dumb language and everything needs to be hard, right?!

WHO’S that freak in my window? Who is that freak in my window? YES.

WHO’S excited to go to Helium Park in Eldridge? Who is excited to go to Eldridge? YES.

WHO’S coat is on the floor, again? Who is coat is on the floor, again? NO.

WHOSE coat is on the floor? YES

Who’s car is parked in my spot? Who is car is parked in my spot? NO.

WHOSE car is parked in my spot? YES

Who’s bright idea was 5:30 am cross fit? Who is bright idea was 5:30 am cross fit? NO!

WHOSE bright idea was 5:30 am cross fit? YES

Just remember the following and it’s all good:

Who’s = WHO IS, contraction 
WHOSE =  possessive adjective

Got it? Good!

Curious about the right time to use who's or whose? This quick 5 minute grammar lesson will teach you the right usage in no time.

Here are more grammar posts you may like:

How to make the word PEOPLE possessive

Bias or Biased?

Do to or Due to?

Less or Fewer?

Should have gone or Should have went?

And if you’re looking for helpful grammar resources, here are my top picks:

Grammarly – Instantly fix over 250 types of errors with this free web-based grammar checker!

Strunk & White Elements of Style

The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation 

Eats, Shoots, and Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation 

The Grammar Girl’s Quick & Dirty Tips for Better Writing

 

Check back next Sunday for another quick grammar lesson! And if you’d like to get weekly grammar tips delivered straight to your inbox, please subscribe to my once a week newsletter. I promise I won’t spam you. 🙂

5 Minute Grammar Lesson – Is it Broke or Broken?

Are you curious about the proper use of the words broke or broken? It’s time for another 5 Minute Grammar lesson! This quick post describes when to use each word and also lists common improper uses.

Are you curious about the proper use of the words broke or broken? This quick post describes when to use each word and also lists common improper uses.
*This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting my site.*

Broke or Broken? 

Let’s look at BROKE first.

In a nutshell, the word broke has two uses. First, it is a verb, meaning an object is damaged. Kaput. Trash. Finished.

I broke my car when I drove down mud road and shouldn’t have.

My kid broke her arm because she’s a little hooligan.

The plate broke when he dropped it on the floor.

However, BROKE, can also be used as an adjective to show that someone has completely run out of money.

I have no money. I’m broke.

She’s broke. She shouldn’t buy that.

He’s broke but he never has any money anyway.

They’re broke and spending money they don’t have.

How about broken?

BROKEN also has two potential uses, both adjectives. The first use, and most common, is to use BROKEN as an adjective to describe a noun that has been damaged and is no longer working properly. 

The car is broken. Don’t drive it.

He needs to go to the doctor because his arm is broken.

The grill is broken, so we’ll have to order pizza.

Another use for BROKEN is to describe a person who has given up all hope.

I am utterly broken every time I hear about someone’s broke grill.

So what’s the big problem with broke or broken anyway, you might well ask.

Well, I’m so glad you asked. The problem happens when the two words are confused with each other and something is described as BROKE  when it’s actually BROKEN. 

Help! My car is broke! {Unless the car has a secret money supply, it’s actually BROKEN and not broke.}

My arm is broke. It hurts so much! {Again, the arm is actually BROKEN and not broke.}

And it’s really that simple. Describe damaged objects as BROKEN, people who are beyond hope as BROKEN, and reserve the word BROKE for when you find yourself with no money. Got it? Good. 😀

Here are more grammar posts you may like:

How to make the word PEOPLE possessive

Bias or Biased?

Do to or Due to?

Less or Fewer?

Should have gone or Should have went?

And if you’re looking for helpful grammar resources, here are my top picks:

Grammarly – Instantly fix over 250 types of errors with this free web-based grammar checker!

Strunk & White Elements of Style

The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation 

Eats, Shoots, and Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation 

The Grammar Girl’s Quick & Dirty Tips for Better Writing

Are you curious about the proper use of the words broke or broken? This quick post describes when to use each word and also lists common improper uses.

Check back next Sunday for another quick grammar lesson! And if you’d like to get weekly grammar tips delivered straight to your inbox, please subscribe to my once a week newsletter. I promise I won’t spam you. 🙂

10 Helpful Grammar Resources #BB100

Today’s Day 10 of the Boost Your Blog Grammar Series – the last day! I’ve hope it’s been a useful for you and that you’ve learned some new grammar tricks and have been inspired to work just a little bit harder on the grammar in your posts.  Today I want to share with you a few helpful grammar resources, in case you are inspired to keep learning!
#BB100
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How to Make the Word PEOPLE Possessive

Are you wondering how to make the word people possessive? It’s not that hard, but it does deserve a quick explanation.

Making the word "people" possessive isn't hard, but a lot of people get it wrong. Make sure you're right with this helpful information.

*This post contains affiliate links which means I earn me a small commission on your purchase.*

” Touched peoples’ lives.”

At first I thought, “How nice. They used an apostrophe.” The college students in my Comp I classes have a terrible time with apostrophes. They use them to make words plural (rarely a good idea) and then forget them when they need to make words possessive. Is it that hard to tell when a word should be possessive or when it’s plural? Maybe someone can tell me so I can better help my Comp I students.

Then I looked again. PEOPLES’. Oh. No. Really?! ?Adding the apostrophe AFTER the -s on the word PEOPLE is WRONG. If you’re confused by how to make the word PEOPLE possessive, read on.

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