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How to Store Potatoes Over Winter

How to store potatoes over winter

2014 marks the second year I have planted potatoes following the no-dig potato planting method. I first tried this method in 2013 after reading about it in my Rodale’s Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening. Last year, I had an awesome potato harvest – well over 200 pounds. And this year, I ended up with about the same. I don’t have quite as many to store this year because we’ve eaten more of them so far, but since many people have asked me how my potatoes fared last year, I thought it was time for a post!

My method of potato storage last year was really high tech. I threw all my potatoes together in wooden bushel baskets I found a while back at Goodwill (they’re for sale on Amazon too, if you’re looking for some) and then stored them in my barn kitchen. When I needed potatoes, I just grabbed some out of the baskets and cooked them. A few did rot, but for the most part, my family of 6 was able to eat most of them over the winter and spring with little spoilage.

Since then, I have been thinking maybe I should do a better job of storing my potatoes. So, I’ve done a bit of research and here’s what I fount out.

How to Store Potatoes Over Winter

Plant the right type of potato

I planted four types of potatoes this year, and one criteria I always look for when choosing which varieties to plant is how well they store. Some potatoes, like Yukon Gold, are better keepers than other potatoes. For a comprehensive list of potatoes types and qualities, read this article from WSU, or read seed catalog descriptions too. That’s what I do, and here’s a list of my favorite free seed catalogs.

This year, I planted about 18 plants of each of the following potato varieties:

  • Yukon Gold
  • Kennebec
  • Purple Viking
  • Yellow Finn

[Read more…]

Easy Thanksgiving Side Dish ~ Buttery Carrots

If you’re looking for a delicious side dish to serve with your Thanksgiving meal, look no further! These super simple, very delicious carrots will enhance any meal, and your kids will eat them!

Easy Thanksgiving Side Dish ~ Buttery Carrots

To prepare, simply julienne 5 large carrots. Melt 3-4 TBS butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add carrots and saute for 15-20 minutes. I prefer a slightly crunchy carrot, so I tend to under cook mine. {I have been accused of being a little weird, though.} You cook them as long as you’d like. Season with salt and pepper and serve!

Buttery Carrots

Buttery Carrots

Ingredients

  • 5 large carrots, peeled and julienned {I tend to keep mine pretty fat, but skinnier carrots cook quicker}
  • 3-4 TBS butter
  • salt & pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Melt butter in skillet over medium to medium high heat.
  2. Add carrots.
  3. Cook for 15-20 minutes, or until desired softness is reached.
  4. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Enjoy!

Nutrition Information:


Amount Per Serving: Calories: 1661 Total Fat: 40g Carbohydrates: 307g Protein: 26g

Linking up: Healthy 2day Wednesday; Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways; KidsareGrown;

Quick & Easy Way to Freeze Corn

Keep the mess and heat out of your kitchen with this quick and easy way to freeze corn!

Keep the mess outside with this quick and easy way to freeze fresh corn

I love freshly frozen corn for use in taco soup, vegetable soups, and other recipes as well. We (me, hubby, father-in-law, kiddos) froze 50 quarts of corn a while back in fewer than 3 1/2 hours! Total cost – $1.25 and time! Three and a half hours of time was the biggest cost, but that’s all the time it took to shuck it, clean it, boil it, cut it off the cobs, bag it, and store it! I was shocked we got it done so quickly, especially since it’s usually all day affair featuring me and other female relatives. Turns out men are very hard workers and pretty industrious! Here’s how we did it!

How to Freeze Corn

shuck and clean corn

We’ve been pretty lucky the last couple of years to have awesome neighbors who grow the corn for us. We just have to show up and pick it out of the field near our little homestead. We brought the corn home in our tractor and then involved the whole family in shucking and cleaning in the shade of the garage. While the water came to a boil in the outdoor cooker, everyone was busy in the garage.

boiling the corn in a turkey burner outside is an easy way to freeze corn

The real secret to keeping the mess out of your kitchen is to clean and cook the corn outdoors in an outdoor cooker. Seriously, if you freeze a lot of corn, invest in an outdoor cooker! For real! Boiling the corn outdoors keeps my kitchen so much cooler and cleaner, plus the pot is so big I can cook so much more corn at once. I love using the outdoor cooker for freezing corn. Boil for 4-5 minutes (after you’ve shucked and cleaned it).

cool the corn in an ice water bath

Cool in a big, clean tub until you can handle it. It’s helpful to use ice to cool the corn more quickly.

take the corn indoors to cut it off the cob

Take it inside to cut off the cobs. I’ve used a Pampered Chef Corn Slicer in the past and also a knife to cut the corn off the cobs. Cutting the corn off the cobs is the worst part I’m excited to try out the Kuhn Rikon Corn Zipper next time I freeze corn. Have you tried any special corn cutters?

bag cut corn, clean, label, and put in freezer

Bag it up, clean off the bags, label them and freeze! I use quart bags because I have a large family. But you can use whatever size baggies you’d like.

Quick & Easy Way to Freeze Corn

Quick & Easy Way to Freeze Corn

Keep the mess outside with this quick and easy way to freeze corn

Cook Time 4 minutes
Total Time 4 minutes

Ingredients

  • Tons of fresh corn

Instructions

  1. Bring water to boil in the largest pot you have.
  2. Shuck, clean, and cut off any bad spots.
  3. Once the water is boiling hard, add corn and let the water return to a boil. Once the water is boiling again, boil the corn for 4-5 minutes.
  4. Cool the corn in a large pot using cold water and ice until the corn is cool enough to handle.
  5. Cut the corn off the cobs and bag the corn. Flatten the bags, clean, and label then.
  6. Freeze!

Total cost for 50 quarts of corn: $1.25 for the freezer bags because I scored a super sweet deal. 30 minutes to pick. 3 1/2 hours to process. 15 minutes to tidy my kitchen. Those numbers make me happy. And my father-in-law’s sweet corn isn’t even ready yet. If we can keep the raccoons out, we may have more. 🙂

Do you freeze corn? Have you ever used an outdoor cooker? This is our go-to method for freezing corn.